Saskatchewan Council for Archives and Archivists - AN EXHIBITION

Saskatchewan in Two World Wars
Memorials

Individuals, organizations, and governments created numerous permanent memorials recognizing the sacrifice of those Canadian men and women who served in each of the two world wars. These commemorations of service range from rolls of honour and plaques to statue and structures. In some instances participants in toto are honoured - all who serviced in the country's armed forces overseas or on the home front. Others commemorate a specific platoon or regiment.



The Memorial Gates at the University of Saskatchewan, c. 1929. [159]


The Memorial Tablet which records the names of students and faculty who perished in World War I, c. 1930. [160]
click for larger image


The Memorial Union Building (MUB) at the University, 1955. [161]
Click for larger image.
click for larger image


Commemorating those members of the College of Law who served in World War II, 1999. [162]
Click for larger image.


A sketch of the Cenotaph in Saskatoon, c. 1926. [163]
click for larger image


Honour Roll of the Saskatoon Light Infantry, 1945. [164]
Click for larger image.
click for larger image


The University of Saskatchewan Roll of Honour, 1946. [165]
Click for larger image.



Plaque honouring the members of the 46th Battalion, 1933. [166]
click for larger image


News item concerning the plaque commemorating the 46th, 1933. [167]
Click for larger image.
click for larger image


Program for the Memorial Service for former University of Saskatchewan English professor, R.J.G. Bateman, 1918. [168]
Click for larger image.


Display memorializing Bernie Adilman, son of the Saskatoon store owner, 1975. [169]



The Star-Phoenix clock erected by W. Herman in honour of T. Lawson, his partner, who made the ultimate sacrifice in World War I, c. 1950. [170]



William Allen, Professor of Farm Management at the University of Saskatchewan, 1938. [171]
click for larger image


Item on the unveiling of a plaque at the federal Department of Agriculture building in Ottawa, honouring William Allen, 1942. [172]
Click for larger image.


Booklet identifying and commemorating Saskatchewan's Victoria Cross recipients, 1995. [173]


Perhaps Saskatchewan's most commemorated soldier is Sergeant Hugh Cairns, the soldier who has come to symbolize the Great War for the inhabitants of Saskatoon. A member of the Christ Church choir - and football (soccer) team - Cairns enlisted in the 65th Infantry Battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force at Saskatoon on August 2, 1915. He subsequently was transferred to the 46th Infantry Battalion prior to his departure from England for France. Private Cairns was awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for "conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty" in a battle near Avion in June 1917. He also saw action at Passchendaele in November and Amiens in August 1918. He was shot by a captive German officer after Valenciennes and died of his wounds the following day, November 2, 1918 - nine days before the armistice. Cairns was posthumously awarded the Victoria Cross for his "most conspicuous bravery." He was also made a chevalier of the Legion of Honour by the French government and had an avenue in Valenciennes named for him. At home he is commemorated by a statue honouring footballers who were killed during the war, a school bearing his name, and the Hugh Cairns V. C. Armoury.



Hugh Cairns V.C., c. 1917. [175]
click for larger image


The citation for bravery published in the London Gazette, 1919. [175]
Click for larger image.


Memorial in Kinsman Park, Saskatoon to Cairns and his fellow footballers, 1988. [176]

click for larger image


Roll of Honour, Saskatoon Football Association, 1921. [177]
Click for larger image.


NEXT: CONCLUSION

Saskatchewan in Two World WarsVirtual Displays

This site has been made possible by financial support from the federal government
through the National Archives of Canada and the Canadian Council of Archives.


2001 Saskatchewan Council for Archives and Archivists. All Rights Reserved